Individualisation thesis beck

RJ said law is a factor, but not key; changes in society have influenced TUs' ability to organise - the switch from collectivism to individualism - and their failure to deal with current issues. JM also mentioned the shift from manufacturing to service industries as a factor but as legal reform has been such a prominent feature of the changes we are discussing we will ensure that our website coverage of the history of unions and the law is developed and have a presentation in due course at the Forum. We need a holistic account of the place of the different factors in this crucial union/employer/society/state period.

The airline industry is responsible for the transportation of people, goods and post around the globe (cp. Netzer 1999, p. 18). It is affected by many factors, including war, economic business cycle, and business competition (cp. Wang 2004, p. 455) as well as its traditionally high level of regulation (cp. Vaara/Kleymann/Seristoe 2004, p. 11). It has been characterised as being an extremely competitive, safety-sensitive, service industry [14] (cp. Appelbaum/Fewster 2002, p. 66). These three characteristics of the industry have a large impact on HRM, as will be explained in subsequent paragraphs.

The administration of the 2016 local government elections in South Africa has been celebrated as yet another important contributor to the delivery of free and fair elections. Yet competitive elections, an essential component of any democratic system, require more than smooth running administrative systems. Competitive elections require conditions that create a climate of tolerance, free political campaigning, and open public debate. An election without freedom to campaign is doomed to be stunted and inefficient as the right to freedom of expression is one of a web of mutually supporting rights the Constitution affords to citizens. This paper presents an analysis of narrative reports on instances of violations of the Electoral Code of Conduct, including intimidation and violence, gathered by Civil Society violence monitors and election observers from 1 March until 31 September 2016. The analysis reveals that whilst the vast majority of South Africans can vote and express their opinions without fear of retribution, there are underlying tensions militating against constitutionally protected political rights. When viewed  in conjunction with the Afrobarometer survey data (2016) on perceptions of political space in South Africa, in the context of Diamond and Morlino’s minimum requirements for democracy, it becomes clear that pre-election campaign space is fragile and not given, and will therefore need to be nurtured in future elections.

Presenter biography : Nkosikhulule Xhawulengweni Nyembezi is a PhD Candidate in Public Law, a policy analyst, a researcher, and a human rights activist. His research interests are in the areas of Electoral Democracy and Good Governance, Socio-Economic Rights, Anti-Corruption Institutional Frameworks, and Early Childhood Development.

Lewin, Sian
Research topic: Inside Regulated Organisations: How Banks Respond To Regulatory Change
Supervisors: Prof Julia Black and Prof Bridget Hutter
Description: This project explores how regulated organisations experience regulation in a period of considerable regulatory change. It examines organisational responses to change through the lens of neo-institutionalist organisational theory and sociological work on risk and organisations. The thesis considers the material practices of regulatory work and the construction of regulatory identities for the purpose of rebuilding or maintaining legitimacy in the eye of the regulator. It uses a case study of UK banks and prudential regulatory reform in the context of the post-financial crisis environment.
Research interests: Sociology of risk and regulation, Social Studies of Finance, Economic Sociology, Organisational Theory
Contact : @ @SianLewin

Individualisation thesis beck

individualisation thesis beck

Lewin, Sian
Research topic: Inside Regulated Organisations: How Banks Respond To Regulatory Change
Supervisors: Prof Julia Black and Prof Bridget Hutter
Description: This project explores how regulated organisations experience regulation in a period of considerable regulatory change. It examines organisational responses to change through the lens of neo-institutionalist organisational theory and sociological work on risk and organisations. The thesis considers the material practices of regulatory work and the construction of regulatory identities for the purpose of rebuilding or maintaining legitimacy in the eye of the regulator. It uses a case study of UK banks and prudential regulatory reform in the context of the post-financial crisis environment.
Research interests: Sociology of risk and regulation, Social Studies of Finance, Economic Sociology, Organisational Theory
Contact : @ @SianLewin

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