Examples of introductions for a research paper

The beauty of haiku often becomes the bane of impatient writers: capturing a single moment, movement, or experience in its entirety, in three lines totaling 17 syllables or less. The masters of the form spent years of traveling, wandering, observing, contemplating, and writing to refine their craft into the timeless literary flashes that populate haiku collections and anthologies today. The patron saint. Without question, the patron saint of haiku is Matsuo Basho, the Japanese wanderer-poet with a strong knowledge of Chinese classical poetry. Basho wrote in all Japanese lyrical verse forms, plus narrative travelogue, but he set up most of his work with hokku, now considered by many the greatest haiku ever written. Note the precise focus with which he conveys a moment: Matsuo Basho (1644-1694) Autumn moonlight –

The order of items above is the best order to present each part of the introduction: get the reader's attention, move toward the thesis statement, and then present the thesis statement. The thesis statement usually is most effective as just one sentence at the end of the introduction, so you should avoid presenting the thesis statement as the first sentence of the introduction and should avoid presenting the thesis statement in more than one sentence. (Information about thesis statements is presented on The Thesis Statement Web page.)

Examples of introductions for a research paper

examples of introductions for a research paper

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