Ecclesiastical history of the english people essay

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The Nobla Lecon , (Noble Lesson)
The "Noble Lesson" written in the Language of the ancient inhabitants of the Valleys (The Waldenses); in the Year 1100. Extracted out of a most authentic manuscript, the true original whereof is to be seen in the public library of the famous University of Cambridge. "The History of the Evangelical Churches of the Valleys of Piedmont." by Samuel Morland. 1658. CHRAA. 1982.  

The accuracy of Eusebius' account has often been called into question. In the 5th century, the Christian historian Socrates Scholasticus described Eusebius as writing for “rhetorical finish” and for the “praises of the Emperor” rather than the “accurate statement of facts.” [6] The methods of Eusebius were criticised by Edward Gibbon in the 18th century. [7] In the 19th century Jacob Burckhardt viewed Eusebius as 'a liar', the “first thoroughly dishonest historian of antiquity.” [7] Ramsay MacMullen in the 20th century regarded Eusebius' work as representative of early Christian historical accounts in which “Hostile writings and discarded views were not recopied or passed on, or they were actively suppressed... matters discreditable to the faith were to be consigned to silence.” [8] As a consequence this kind of methodology in MacMullen's view has distorted modern attempts, (. Harnack, Nock, and Brady), to describe how the Church grew in the early centuries. [9] Arnaldo Momigliano wrote that in Eusebius' mind "chronology was something between an exact science and an instrument of propaganda " [10] Drake in the 21st century treats Eusebius as working within the framework of a "totalizing discourse" that viewed the world from a single point of view that excluded anything he thought inappropriate. [11]

Ecclesiastical history of the english people essay

ecclesiastical history of the english people essay

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